Nova Scotia Coordinator

Nova Scotia now has a new Coordinator!

Medric Cousineau (known as ‘Cous’) originally came to Project Healing Waters Canada as a participant.

‘Cous’ graduated from the Royal Military College (RMC). However his career as a naval aviator was cut short by injuries sustained doing Search & Rescue. He was awarded the Star of Courage during this time.

PTSD Survivor
Nova Scotia
Medric and his dog Thai

As a result of his rescue work, Cous understands what it is like to be a survivor of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

His award winning work with Service Dogs and Paws Fur Thought is documented in his book, ‘Further Than Yesterday: That’s All That Counts’. Cous made his experiences public in order to shine the light on the issues veterans face and to help others.

Cous credits Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Canada and his fishing buddies for helping him find his “happy place”. He likes nothing more than being on the rivers and streams, and at the tying vise.

Consequently, from key fob brookies to trophy fish, Cous is happiest on the water. He is now getting to share his passion and obsession with others.

Nova Scotia
‘Cous’

He loves teaching children Tenkara fishing. Tenkara is the Japanese method of fly-fishing, which uses only a rod, line and fly.

As Nova Scotia Provincial Coordinator, Cous most of all hopes to help others “Heal on the Fly”.

New Coordinator BC

Coordinator BC

new project healing waters canada coordinator bc

 

We’re delighted to announce that Don Smith is our new Project Healing Waters Canada Coordinator in British Columbia (BC).

Don is a former engineering officer who retired from the Royal Canadian Navy after a thirty-five year career.

Don was raised in Ottawa, Ontario where he learned to fish at the family cottage near Perth.  After graduating from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), Don took up fly fishing during a posting to Halifax.

As he and his family moved across Canada and the United States, fly fishing and fly tying became passions that grew and remain strong to this day.

Don benefited greatly from some excellent mentors. As Coordinator BC,  he hopes to pass on what he knows to the veterans who are novices to fishing.

Proud to have served in the Navy, Don is happy no longer being in an office with four walls. He much prefers the rivers and beaches of Vancouver Island. He lives with his wife, Lynn, (another fisher who is rather more patient than he) in Victoria, BC.

Please join us in giving Don a warm welcome to our Project.

New Project Healing Waters Canada Coordinator New Brunswick

New Project Healing Waters Canada Coordinator New Brunswick
Chuck Boudreau
New Project Healing Waters Canada coordinator New Brunswick is announced

 

A New Project Healing Waters Canada Coordinator New Brunswick is now confirmed and his name is Charles Boudreau. Known as Chuck, he originally comes from Bathurst.

Thanks to his Dad, Chuck was introduced to fishing and fly fishing at an early age. Consequently, when he was 13 years-old, he started tying flies. He is also a professional fly tyer and, as a result, continues to give lessons as a fly tying instructor.

In the late ‘70s, Chuck graduated from Bathurst High School and attended New Brunswick Community College for a degree in Electronics.

After graduation, Chuck took a position with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in northern New Brunswick. His role was field technician, involving Atlantic salmon enhancement on the Nepisiquit River in the province.

Chuck eventually joined the Canadian Air Force in 1984. He served in various locations, all the while with a fly rod by his side. In 2010, he retired and took a position with IMP Aerospace for a 5 year contract.

Now living in Burton, New Brunswick, Chuck shares his home with his lovely wife. Furthermore, the couple have two boys that are now out of the house and with families of their own.

In conclusion, Chuck is looking forward to teaching and helping fellow veterans. Most of all, he hopes to get them out to enjoy the great outdoors with tight lines, and maybe with a fly they tied themselves.